Harvard School of Design

We have been striving to practice this way and welcome the systemic structure to measure our progress and to challenge our path to higher heights.

Tom Sieniewicz, Partner, Chan Krieger NBBJ


Guest lecturers David Perkes and Roberta Feldman (right) with visitor Katie Swenson
at the first Public Interest Design Institute July 20-22, 2011 at the Harvard
Graduate School of Design in Cambridge, MA.

July 20–22, 2011 | 9am – 5pm
Tuition $1,350
21 aia/Ces (hsW) | 21 aiCP/CM | 21 La/Ces (hsW)This three-day course will provide architecture and other design professionals in public interest design with in-depth study on methods of how design can address the critical issues faced by communities. Training in public interest design is a way of enhancing an existing design practice and learning skills to become pro-actively engaged in community-based design. The curriculum is formed around the Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) metric, a set of standards that outlines the process and principles of this growing approach to design. This process provides a step-bystep aid for those who want to undertake public interest design. Certification in the SEED process will be given.

Academic Leader:
Bryan Bell, Design Corps, Raleigh NC.

Guest speakers:

Lisa Abendroth,  Professor of Art,  Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Brent Brown,  buildingcommunity WORKSHOP,  Dallas TX.
Lawrence Cheng,  AIA, LEED,  Associate Principal, Bruner/Cott Associates, Cambridge MA.
Maurice Cox,  University of Virginia School of Architecture,  Charlottesville VA.
Roberta Feldman,  University of Illinois at Chicago School of Architecture.
Sergio Palleroni,  Portland State University,  Portland OR.
David Perkes,  Mississippi State University,  Biloxi MS.
John Peterson,  Public Architecture,  San Francisco CA.
Philip Szostak,  FAIA, Principal-in-Charge, Szostak Design,  Chapel Hill NC.
Barbara Wilson,  Ph.D., director, Center for Sustainable Development,  The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture.

Post Evaluations:

Attendees of the first Public Interest Design Training rated learning objectives of the institute with “5” as highly successfully “3” as successfully and “1” as unsuccessfully to the following:

Average Learning Objective Score:

4.7      Maximizing a project’s positive impact on a community

4.7      Moving beyond LEED to measure the social, economic and environmental impact on communities.

4.7      Understanding public interest design and how is it re-shaping the design professions.

4.6      Using a step-by-step process of working with a community as a design partner.

4.4      Identifying new fee sources.

4.1      Leveraging other partners and assets to address project challenges.

3.75   Finding new clients and public interest design projects.